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Why Project Managers need Six Sigma

The benefits of Six Sigma include better understanding of changing customer requirements, improvement of quality and delivery, reduction of waste, reduction of cost, development of robust products and processes, enhancement of competitive position, and sustained competitive advantage through continuous improvement of all business systems in the organization.
and administration.

Six Sigma and Project Management

With Six Sigma’s DMAIC process, a problem is first defined and quantified; then measurement data is collected to bound and clarify the problem; analytical tools are deployed to trace the problem to the root cause; a solution for the root cause is identified and implemented; and finally, the improved operations are subjected to ongoing control to prevent recurrence. The Six Sigma toolkit includes a variety of techniques, primarily from statistical data analysis and quality improvement. Design of experiments (DOE), failure mode and effects analysis (FMEA), cause-and-effect diagram (aka fishbone diagram, Ishikawa diagram), process flow diagram and gage repeatability and reproducibility (R&R) studies are among Six Sigma’s many tools.

How They Work Together

  • A PMP® certified professional focuses on improving the success rate of projects. A Six Sigma-certified professional focuses on finding and eliminating defects within a specific process
  • A certified Six Sigma professional aims to reduce wasted time, effort and money on a specific process, while a PMP® certified professional focuses on how to plan and execute a project
  • Six Sigma projects have a continuous control phase, while project management focuses on completing a project by a specific deadline
  • A Six Sigma professional uses data-driven methods and statistics to identify and solve a challenge, while a PMP® certified project manager uses standardized practices to efficiently deliver a project that meets a pre-determined goal.

 

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